2016-2017 Catalog 
    
    Jul 01, 2022  
2016-2017 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Humanities

  
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    HUMAN 202 Form and Structure in the Arts

    (HF 900)
    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    Coursework is divided among literature, painting, and music. Emphasis is on formal structure of these works, and on analysis rather than appreciation.
  
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    HUMAN 203 Major Modern Ideas

    (IAI: H4 902)
    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course examines major modern ideas that revolutionized how we think about human nature, history, and society. Focusing on the writings of Darwin, Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, the course gives students an opportunity to reflect on what these thinkers said and debate the legacy of their ideas. Selections from other modern thinkers may be included to help students see the origins of ongoing debates about human culture.

Hydraulics

  
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    HYDR 101 Fundamentals of Hydraulics


    Prerequisite: AMATH 112 with a C or better
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This is a general course covering the basic components of hydraulic systems, and the basic laws and formulas involved in simple fluid power calculations. Topics include pumps, control valves, actuators, the use of ASAIS symbols, and maintenance procedures.
  
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    HYDR 102 Hydraulic Pumps


    Prerequisite: HYDR 101  
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This is a study of various fluid power pumps and their principles of operation, construction, and maintenance. Fixed gear, vane, axial, and radial piston, and variable delivery pumps are covered in addition to combination pumps and self-contained power units.
  
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    HYDR 103 Hydraulic Controls


    Prerequisite: HYDR 101 
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course provides a study of the various controls used in fluid power. Topics covered: pressure and volume theory, operation and construction of valves, and circuit applications. Also covered are valves and their assemblies, the relief, pressure reducing sequence, counterbalance, brake, volume and control and directional, in addition to various types of valve controls.
  
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    HYDR 104 Basic Hydraulic Circuits


    Prerequisite: HYDR 103 
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This is a study of fluid power circuit fundamentals, calculations and design. Circuits studied: pump-unloading, speed, pressure, volume, deceleration, sequence, servo, oil conditioning, and transfer line.
  
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    HYDR 106 Pneumatics


    Prerequisite: Placement into MATH 090 or higher or completion of MATH 085 with a C or better
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course offers a study of fundamental pneumatic principles, gas laws, calculations, ASAIS symbols and terminology. Also considered are the way air is compressed, the compressed air system, controlling pneumatic power, and the introduction of fluidics.

Information Technology

  
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    IT 101 IT Orientation


    Prerequisite: None
    1 lecture, 1 hr credit
    This course enables students to analyze the field of information technology. The class will include a survey of IT professions, employment skills, definitions, current issues, salaries, and self-assessment survey of skills and competencies. This course will meet three times during the semester. Online course work is required. Students also will be required to create a student plan based on the degree and program requirements for the IT programs at Prairie State College. This is a co-requisite course taken prior to or in conjunction with the initial IT entry core courses.
  
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    IT 106 Mathematics for Computers


    Prerequisite: MATH 090  or qualifying score on Math Placement Test
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the numerical concepts required for data processing. Included in the course are the following topics: binary, octal and hexadecimal number systems, set theory, logic, floating and fixed point numbers, problem solving, and algebra as it relates to data processing.
  
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    IT 140 Introduction to Operating Systems


    Prerequisite: ITAPP 101  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lecture,2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course describes the purpose of operating systems and how they work from a business, personal, and PC support perspective. This course provides hands-on experience in file maintenance, configurations, Windows customization, file systems, basic trouble-shooting, and running applications with Windows operating systems. Other operating systems (command prompt, Linux, and networking) are reviewed, compared and discussed.
  
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    IT 201 Systems Design and Development


    Prerequisite: ITAPP 101  with a grade of C or better; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course provides an analysis of the information flow within the business organization. The systems development life cycle is studied with both physical and logical design considerations. Case studies are used to illustrate the steps of a system study.
  
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    IT 205 Ethics in Information Technology


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course explores the legal, ethical, and societal issues in the information technology (IT) world. Students examine various ethical situations that arise in IT and formulate ideas for addressing these issues. Topics include computer and Internet crime, privacy rights, freedom of expression, intellectual property, and employer/employee issues.
  
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    IT 240 Linux Operating System


    Prerequisite: IT 140  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course provides an in-depth study of and hands-on experience with the primary functions of the Linux operating system. The major essential command-line commands, as well as use of the graphical user interface are covered. This course provides theoretical and practical concepts including file systems, elementary shell scripting, and other end-use knowledge necessary to move to the next level of basic system administration. Basic administrative tasks that are necessary for maintaining a working system are explored.
  
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    IT 295 Portfolio Seminar


    Prerequisite: 12 hours minimum IT courses successfully completed with a C or better; consent of instructor.
    1 lecture, 2 lab hrs, 2 hrs credit
    This is a capstone course. Students must have completed the minimum requirement of IT hours in their designated IT program concentration courses. This course serves as an alternate option to the ITNET 299 , ITPRG 299 , or ITWEB 299  student internships. The seminar is project based and includes development of a resume, a portfolio, and the “soft skills” important to the IT industry. Online coursework, face-to-face meetings, electronic meeting sessions, and email correspondence is required.

Information Technology - Applications

  
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    ITAPP 101 Introduction to Computers

    (BUS 902)
    Prerequisite: Keyboarding (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course provides an overview of current computer technology and trends. Topics include computer terminology, hardware, application software, networks, and the Internet. Students are also introduced to the latest business software – word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and presentation graphics.
  
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    ITAPP 109 Introduction to the Internet


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lab hrs per week: 1 hr credit
    This course is a comprehensive study of the Internet through hands-on experience. All of the basic Internet applications are covered, including e-mail, the World Wide Web, search strategies, file protocol, Web security, and social issues.
  
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    ITAPP 121 Word Processing Applications – Level 1


    Prerequisite: ITOFS 100  (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course prepares students to work with the latest word processing software in a career setting or for personal use. Students develop a mastery-level competence in word processing by creating and editing business documents. (may be repeated three times)
  
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    ITAPP 125 Spreadsheet Applications - Level 1


    Prerequisite: Keyboarding (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course teaches students to use the latest spreadsheet software. Topics covered include creating and editing worksheets, creating formulas and functions, maintaining and enhancing worksheets and workbooks, and creating charts.
  
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    ITAPP 128 Database Applications - Level 1


    Prerequisite: Keyboarding (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course provides hands-on experience with the most current and widely used database software. Topics covered include creating and editing database files, queries, and forms; grouping data for reports; indexing; creating labels and menu structures; importing and exporting data.
  
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    ITAPP 133 Presentation Applications


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    1 lecture, 2 lab hrs per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course teaches students to use current desktop presentation software to plan, construct, and produce effective desktop presentations. Students complete assigned projects using special predefined layout features in the software to produce slide presentations.

Information Technology - Networking

  
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    ITNET 160 Computer Repair


    Prerequisite: IT 140  with a grade of C or better; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 4 lab hrs per week: 4 hrs credit
    This course is an introduction to personal computer upgrades, maintenance, and repair. Topics include computer hardware, software, operating systems, troubleshooting, and how to fix, upgrade, and build a computer. This course covers the latest technologies and objectives of the CompTIA A+ certification exams.
  
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    ITNET 165 Introduction to Networking


    Prerequisite: IT 140  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course covers the skills and concepts needed to configure and operate a variety of networking products, including a wide range of vendor and product neutral networking technologies. Topics include networking theory, protocols, connectivity devices, Internet addressing, internetworking servers, security, and troubleshooting. Successful completion prepares students to pass CompTIA’s entry-level networking certification exam.
  
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    ITNET 250 Introduction to LAN Administration


    Prerequisite: IT 140  with a grade of C or better; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    Topics include local area network (LAN) terminology, hardware and software components required in a networked environment, and administration of common network operating systems. Hands-on activities include creating and managing user accounts, file sharing, printing, and other tasks related to network administration.
  
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    ITNET 260 Network Security Fundamentals


    Prerequisite: ITNET 165  with a grade of C or better or Network+ certification; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course covers the fundamentals of network security including communication security, infrastructure security, cryptography, access control, authentication, external attack, and operational and organization security. Successful completion prepares students for the CompTIA Security+ certification exam.
  
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    ITNET 280 Ethical Hacking


    Prerequisite: ITNET 260  with a grade of C or better; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course introduces students to the art of ethical hacking and network defense, preparing students to be efficient security professionals. Topics include computer ethics, penetration testing, network and computer attacks, social engineering, operating system vulnerabilities, cryptography, and network intrusion issues regarding Web servers and wireless networks.
  
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    ITNET 299 Internship


    Prerequisite: 12 credit hours minimum IT courses successfully completed with a grade of C or better and consent of instructor; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    10 lab hrs per week: 2 hrs credit
    This is a capstone course. Students must have completed the minimum requirement of IT hours in their designated IT program concentration courses. Student interns will be employed at an approved training site. This is scheduled by joint agreement of the student, the site supervisor, and the program coordinator.

Information Technology - Programming

  
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    ITPRG 103 Introduction to Programming Logic


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher; IT 140  with a grade of C or better (recommended).
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course introduces structured programming logic and includes reports, control breaks, extracts, tables, input validation, updates, and file handling concepts. Standard logic charts include flowcharting, pseudo-code, and other charting methods. Solutions to programming projects are in QuickBasic and Visual Basic.
  
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    ITPRG 142 Visual Basic Programming I


    Prerequisite: IT 140  and ITPRG 103  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week 3 hrs transfer credit
    In this introduction to the Visual Basic programming language, object-oriented and event-driven programming essentials, techniques, and applications are stressed. Topics include control objects, decisions and conditions, menus, procedures, looping structures, and array manipulations.
  
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    ITPRG 144 C++ Programming I


    Prerequisite: IT 140  and ITPRG 103  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course provides an introduction to the capabilities of the C++ programming language. Topics covered include variables, operators, control structures, input and output, functions, simple data types, arrays, and strings.
  
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    ITPRG 147 Java Programming I

    (CS 911)
    Prerequisite: IT 140  and ITPRG 103  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lecture, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course provides JAVA programming basics, Object-oriented programming fundamentals are covered as they apply to stand-alone JAVA programs.
  
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    ITPRG 154 C#.Net Programming


    Prerequisite: IT 140  and ITPRG 103  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course covers C#.NET programming concepts. C#.NET was introduced as part of the .NET platform designed to accommodate Internet and Windows applications. Topics covered include writing C#.NET programs using OOP, declaring variables, manipulating data types, creating methods, performing procedures, creating graphical user interfaces, using XML Web Services, developing standalone class libraries, and programming event-driven applications.
  
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    ITPRG 157 Javascript Programming


    Prerequisite: IT 140  with a grade of C or better; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This introductory course in JavaScript programming provides basic programming concepts for designing, developing and integrating scripts into Web pages. The focus includes the use of tags, HTML, objects, event-handling, writing JavaScript functions, and calling JavaScript functions. JavaScript prepares students with a universally accepted scripting language, used for creating dynamic and interactive Web pages.
  
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    ITPRG 171 Game Design


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course introduces students to basic game theory (including game play and strategy) as well as the historical development of all types of games. Games used for education, training, and entertainment are explored. Strong focus is on the design process, from developing a basic concept, to selling the proposal, to production and marketing.
  
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    ITPRG 173 Digital Storytelling


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 101  or higher.
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course focuses on the planning, storyboard design, and scripting of interactive digital productions, such as text, audio, and still and moving images, with a focus on video games. Narrative scripts and design are developed with an emphasis on scene design, characterization, plotting, target audience, messages, and script format. Topics include the advantages and limitations of multimedia as conduit for mediated messages, and the nuances between writing for multimedia and standalone text, audio, and video.
  
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    ITPRG 242 Visual Basic Programming II


    Prerequisite: ITPRG 142  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This is a continuation of ITPRG 142 . Advanced topics in Visual Basic are explored including arrays, multiple forms, data files, and databases, grids, SQL, graphics, OLE, DLL’s, and custom objects. Emphasis is on finding creative solutions to application problems. During the last several weeks of the semester, the class works on a group project for an outside company.
  
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    ITPRG 244 C++ Programming II

    (CS 912)
    Prerequisite: ITPRG 144  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course is a continuation of the C++ introduction. After a review of the introductory topics, study focuses on pointers, arrays, structs, linked lists, recursion, operator overloading, inheritance, and polymorphism.
  
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    ITPRG 247 Java Programming II


    Prerequisite: ITPRG 147  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course is a continuation of ITPRG 147  and provides broader JAVA programming concepts. Object oriented programming concepts are covered as they apply to building event-driven JAVA applets, stand-alone JAVA programs, and GUI programming.
  
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    ITPRG 299 Internship


    Prerequisite: 12 credit hrs minimum IT courses successfully completed with C or better, and consent of instructor; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    10 lab hrs per week: 2 hrs credit
    This is a capstone course. Students must have completed the minimum requirement of IT hours in their designated IT program concentration courses. Student interns will be employed at an approved training site. This is scheduled by joint agreement of the student, the site supervisor, and the program coordinator.

Information Technology - Web Development

  
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    ITWEB 101 Web Page Fundamentals


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course is for students interested in developing specific Internet skills as a Web designer, developer or administrator. Topics include Internet fundamentals, Web page authoring with XHTML and CSS, and networking concepts. Successful completion prepares students to pass exams leading to various Certified Internet Webmaster (CIW) credentials. Please visit prairiestate.edu for the most current, updated catalog information
  
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    ITWEB 103 Web Site Design - Level 1


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher; ITWEB 101  with a C or better (recommended)
    1 lecture, 4 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course teaches students how to create and manage Web sites with current Web authoring tools and languages using various multimedia and industry style standards. Topics include design strategies and techniques, tools, future Web standards, and the incompatibility issues surrounding current browsers. Successful completion prepares students to pass exams leading to various Certified Internet Webmaster (CIW) credentials.
  
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    ITWEB 105 Multimedia Writing


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 101 
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course provides an introduction to basic writing skills necessary to create messages for the multimedia environment such as Web sites, graphics, animations, and digital audio. Upon successful completion, students will be able to write multimedia scripts; demonstrate an understanding of the nuances between writing for multimedia and writing for standalone text, audio and video; describe the advantages and limitations of multimedia as a conduit for mediated messages; and integrate standard expectations of writing including style, grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
  
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    ITWEB 201 Technology of E-Commerce


    Prerequisite: ITWEB 101  or ITWEB 103  with a grade of C or better; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    2 lecture, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course teaches students how to conduct business online and how to manage the technological issues associated with constructing an e-commerce Web site. Students implement a genuine transaction-enabled business-to-consumer Web site, examine strategies and products available for building E-commerce sites, examine how such sites are managed, and explore how they can complement an existing business infrastructure. Successful completion prepares students to pass exams leading to various Certified Internet Webmaster (CIW) credentials.
  
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    ITWEB 203 Web Site Design - Level 2


    Prerequisite: ITWEB 103  with a grade of C or better (recommended); Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    1 lecture, 4 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course develops students’ understanding of interactive Web and design principles. Students will discover how to take the creation and management of Web sites to the next level, using techniques that include CSS layouts, image manipulation, dropdown menus, and advanced navigation. Students will develop an integrated interface for a Web site using programs including, but not limited to, Dreamweaver, Flash and JavaScript. Students will practice scripting and programming with an emphasis on using professional design techniques and standards. Sound, video, animation and interactivity are combined in interactive work. The primary emphasis of this course is development of the students’ portfolio. Writing appropriate to the profession is required.
  
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    ITWEB 299 Internship


    Prerequisite: 12 credit hours minimum IT courses successfully completed with a C or better and consent of instructor; Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    10 lab hrs per week: 2 hrs credit
    This is a capstone course. Students must have completed the minimum requirements of IT hours in their designated IT program concentration courses. Student interns will be employed at an approved training site. This is scheduled by joint agreement of the student, the site coordinator, and the program coordinator.

Journalism

  
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    JRNLM 101 Introduction to Journalism

    (MC 919)
    Prerequisite: ENG 101  with C or better
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course introduces students to the journalism industry and its practices, including techniques of news gathering, reporting, and interviewing. Students learn to use the library and do online database research. Students write basic stories under real-time constraints.

Library and Information Science

  
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    LIB 101 Foundations of Information


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    1 lecture per week; 1 hour transfer credit
    This introductory course addresses the production, dissemination, and evaluation of information and knowledge. Students will gain the skills needed to effectively identify, gather, organize, and evaluate information from a variety of sources, both print and digital. The course will look at the research process as a whole, the ethical use of information, and citation practices.

Manufacturing Technology

  
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    MT 101 Machining Basics – Measurement, Materials, and Safety


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course provides an exploration of the basics in machining, raw materials, use of hand tools, safety, and maintenance. Topics include an overview of measurement techniques, materials, safety, machine tool math, quality control, and maintenance. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included.
  
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    MT 102 Machining Job Planning, Benchwork, and Layout


    Prerequisite: MT 101  with a C or better
    2 lectures; 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course provides an exploration of the basics of hand tools, understanding drawings, manual machines, and layout. Upon completion of this course the student will be able to interpret drawing information, describe basic symbols and notation, and interpret basic GD & T feature control frames. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included.
  
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    MT 105 Metal Working Processes III


    Prerequisite: MT 102 
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course provides students with information on horizontal milling, boring, drilling machines, and their operations. Coursework consists of lectures and demonstrations on the construction of the different types of horizontal machines, the type of work done, the workpiece setup, the tools used and safety practices.
  
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    MT 106 Introduction to Manufacturing and Safety


    Prerequisite: None
    3 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 4 hrs credit
    This course introduces the student to the manufacturing world and provides specific instruction to facilitate safe work practices in industrial environments. It introduces manufacturing specializations such as mechatronics, precision machining, and welding. It also covers fire safety, pressurized gases, electrical hazards, and safe machine usages. Students will become acquainted with OSHA policy and will have the opportunity to earn Safety Certification through the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC).
  
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    MT 107 Quality and Measurement


    Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in MT 106 
    1 lecture, 2 lab hrs per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course provides an introduction to controlling and improving quality in a manufacturing setting. It explores ways that manufacturers use data and analysis to improve quality. Students will have the opportunity to earn the Quality and Measurement Certifications through the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC).
  
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    MT 108 Manufacturing Processes


    Prerequisite: MT 106  with a C or better
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course provides the basics of how manufacturing transforms materials into products. Students will learn about the varying types of production and will learn about the materials that are used in production and the types of processes used in manufacturing including machining, casting, and assembly.
  
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    MT 109 Introduction to Manufacturing Maintenance


    Prerequisite: MT 106  with a C or better
    1 lecture, 2 lab hrs per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course provides a basic understanding of tools and equipment used in manufacturing and knowledge of how to improve productivity through predictive and preventive maintenance.
  
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    MT 210 CNC Milling Level I


    Prerequisite: MT 102 
    1 lecture, 4 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course introduces students to basic milling operations. Upon completion of this course, the student will have an understanding of manual and CNC milling practices and will have gained knowledge in tooling, machining practices, and applied mathematics. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included.
  
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    MT 211 CNC Turning Level I


    Prerequisite: MT 210 
    1 lecture, 4 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course introduces students to basic lathe operations. Upon completion of this course, students will have an understanding of manual and CNC lathe turning practices and wil have gained knowledge in tooling, machining practices, and applied mathematics. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included.
  
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    MT 212 Introduction to Robotics


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course introduces students to the use of robotic devices in various manufacturing environments. It covers topics ranging from the development of robotics, to robotic systems and the operation and programming of robotic devices. Students receive hands-on instruction in the use of the teach pendant and computer-based robotic language programming.
  
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    MT 214 CAD/CAM Systems


    Prerequisite: MT 210 ; CADMD 243  recommended
    2 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course introduces students to the relationship, use, and operations of CAD and CAM systems to generate CNC programs. Students learn to create CAD files for use with a CAM system; to use a CAM system to create geometry, tooling, and post-processor files; and to transmit CAM-generated programs to CNC equipment.
  
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    MT 215 Manufacturing Systems


    Prerequisite: MT 210  and MT 212 
    3 lectures, 2 lab hrs per week: 4 hrs credit
    This course covers the identification, operation, and application of both basic industrial processes and various systems that can be integrated into a computer integrated manufacturing system (CIM). These include CNC, CAD, CAM, and robotics. Students design, program, and implement workcells that include material handling, manufacturing and assembly operations. Emphasis is placed on fully automated production system design and operation.
  
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    MT 220 Metallurgy – Ferrous


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    Iron, steel and their alloys, standard classification systems, properties, and methods of testing are considered. Heat treatment processes, critical temperatures, crystalline structure changes, and standard physical tests and welding metallurgy are studied.
  
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    MT 221 Metallurgy – Nonferrous


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course studies types of nonferrous metals and their applications. Standard classification systems, properties, and methods of testing properties are discussed. In addition, development of new nonferrous metals and their applications are studied.

Mathematics (Applied)

  
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    AMATH 112 Applied Mathematics for the Skilled Trades


    Prerequisite: Placement into MATH 085  or higher
    4 lectures per week; 4 hrs credit
    The course is an applied mathematics course for the skilled trades. It covers the necessary mathematics that will be used in the career and technical education courses. The course will cover arithmetic operations, basic algebra, and an introduction to geometry and trigonometry functions. The course is designed to utilize “real world” examples within the skilled trades using mathematics.

Mathematics (Developmental & College-Level)

  
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    MATH 080 Computational Skills I


    Prerequisite: Qualifying score on Math Placement Test
    4 lectures per week: 4 hrs non-degree, non-transfer credit
    This course provides a background in mathematics for students who do not feel confident in the mastery of arithmetic skills. Topics covered include operations on whole numbers, fractions and decimals, and percents. (may be repeated three times)
  
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    MATH 085 Computational Skills II


    Prerequisite: MATH 080  with a C or better or qualifying score on Math Placement Test
    4 lectures per week: 4 hrs non-degree, non-transfer credit
    This course provides a background in mathematics for students who do not feel confident in the mastery of skills at the pre-algebra level. Topics covered include operations on integers, fractions, and decimals; percents; ratio and proportion; graphs; and measurement. Emphasis is placed on the development of algebraic skills. (variable credit; may be repeated three times)
  
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    MATH 090 Elementary Algebra


    Prerequisite: MATH 085  with a C or better or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test
    5 lectures per week: 4 hrs non-degree, non-transfer credit
    This is a course in elementary algebra. Topics covered include linear equations and inequalities, graphs of linear equations, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, and rational equations. Problem solving is emphasized throughout the course.
  
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    MATH 091 Mathematical Literacy


    Prerequisite: MATH 085 with a C or better, or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test
    6 lectures: 6 hrs non-degree, non-transfer credit
    Mathematical Literacy is a one semester course for those whose major does not require a math class higher than General Education Math (MATH 112) or General Education Statistics (MATH 115). The course will integrate numeracy, proportional reasoning, algebraic reasoning, and an understanding of functions. Students will develop conceptual and procedural tools that support the use of key mathematical concepts in a variety of contexts. Throughout the course, college readiness content will be integrated with mathematical topics. Students in majors needing other college-level math courses such as MATH 151 need to take MATH 095 and any of its required prerequisites instead of this course.
  
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    MATH 095 Intermediate Algebra


    Prerequisite: MATH 090  or MATH 091 with a C or better or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test
    4 lectures per week: 4 hrs non-degree, non-transfer credit
    This is a course in intermediate algebra. It is a prerequisite for transferable college mathematics courses. Topics covered include functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, one- and two-variable inequalities, roots and radicals, complex numbers, and quadratic equations. Emphasis is placed on the development of algebraic skills.
  
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    MATH 096 Geometry


    Prerequisite: MATH 090  with C or better or qualifying score on a placement test
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs non-degree, non-transfer credit
    This is a course covering the fundamental concepts of geometry. It is intended for students who lack credit in one year of high school geometry or need review in the subject matter. Emphasis is placed on learning geometric facts as well as the development of deductive reasoning. Topics covered include plane and solid geometry, properties of congruence, similarity, area, perimeter, and volume.
  
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    MATH 099 Essentials of Numeracy and Algebra


    Prerequisite: One year of Algebra 2 in high school with at least a C and qualifying score on the Math Placement Test
    1-3 lectures: 1-3 hrs credit (variable credit course)
    This co-requisite course will provide appropriately-paced skill and concept development to support students toward success in their general education math/statistics course, replacing the need for other pre-requisite developmental math courses in the traditional sequence, for students only needing a single college-level math course to meet their general education requirements, Students will focus on algebra concepts, number sense, and other skills essential to their course. Requires concurrent registration in an appropriately designated section of MATH 112 or MATH 115, or similar course.
  
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    MATH 111 Mathematics For Paraprofessionals


    Prerequisite: MATH 085  with a C or better or placement into MATH 090  
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs credit
    This course is designed for the elementary school paraprofessional. This course strongly emphasizes hands-on learning; thus, manipulatives are used extensively. Topics covered include problem solving, sets, number theory, statistics, probability, geometry, and measurement. Students seeking general education mathematics credit for transfer are advised to register for the MATH 200 /MATH 206  sequence. (same as EDU 111 )
  
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    MATH 112 General Education Mathematics

    (IAI: M1 904)
    Prerequisite: Either MATH 091 or MATH 095  with a C or better; or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test.
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course is designed for the liberal arts student who is not a mathematics, science, or business major. The course focuses on mathematical reasoning and the solving of real-life problems. The following topics are studied in depth: set theory and logic, the mathematics of finance, probability, and statistics. The use of calculators or computers is a component of the course.
  
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    MATH 115 General Education Statistics

    (M1 902)
    Prerequisite: Either MATH 091 or MATH 095  with a C or better; or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test.
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    The general education statistics course provides students with an opportunity to acquire a reasonable level of statistical literacy and thus expand their base for understanding a variety of work-related, societal, and personal problems, and statistical approaches to the solution of these problems. The main objective of the course is statistical reasoning. Detailed techniques of statistical analysis and the mathematical development of statistical analysis of statistical procedures are not emphasized. The course is intended to meet the general education requirement. It is not intended to be a prerequisite to nor a replacement for courses in statistical methods for business, social science or mathematical statistics. Students who complete this course cannot also receive credit for BUS 240  or MATH 153 .
  
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    MATH 151 College Algebra


    Prerequisite: MATH 095  and MATH 096 , both with at least a C; or MATH 095  and one year of high school geometry, both with at least a C; or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test.
    4 lectures per week: 4 hrs transfer credit
    This course extends on the concepts previously studied in intermediate algebra. Course material is approached both algebraically and graphically. The graphing calculator is used extensively. Topics covered include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their applications.
  
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    MATH 153 Probability and Statistics

    (MI 902)
    Prerequisite: MATH 151  with a C or better or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test
    4 lectures per week: 4 hrs transfer credit
    This is an introductory course in probability and statistics. Topics covered include frequency distribution, percentiles, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, standard deviation, correlation, elementary probability, line of regression, statistical inference, the binomial distribution, the normal distribution, student t-distribution, and the chi-square distribution. Computer software such as MINITAB is used. A comprehensive project is assigned. Students who complete this course cannot also receive credit for BUS 240  or MATH 115 . (same as BUS 240 )
  
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    MATH 155 Finite Mathematics

    (M1 906)
    Prerequisite: MATH 151  with a C or better or qualifying score on Math Placement Test
    4 lectures per week: 4 hrs transfer credit
    This course is an introduction to finite mathematics to meet the needs of business, social science, and liberal arts students. Topics covered include compound interest, annuities, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming and its applications, probability, and logic. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on concepts and applications.
  
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    MATH 157 Calculus for Business and Social Science

    (M1 900-B)
    Prerequisite: MATH 151  with a C or better or qualifying score on Math Placement Test
    4 lectures per week: 4 hrs transfer credit
    This is a one-semester calculus course for business and social science majors. Topics covered include equations of lines, limits, differentiation and integration of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the applications of the basic concepts of calculus. This course does not count for credit toward a mathematics major or minor.
  
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    MATH 165 Pre-Calculus


    Prerequisite: MATH 151  with a C or better
    5 lectures per week: 5 hrs transfer credit
    This pre-calculus course covers trigonometry, polar and parametric equations, conic sections, sequences, and series. It is a preparatory course designed to provide students with the essential skills needed for success in the sequence of courses covering calculus for scientists and engineers.
  
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    MATH 171 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

    (M1 900-1; MTH 901)
    Prerequisite: MATH 165  with a C or better, or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test
    5 lectures per week: 5 hrs transfer credit
    This is the first course in a three semester sequence of courses covering calculus for scientists and engineers. Topics covered include limits, derivatives, applications of derivatives, antiderivatives and definite integrals, and applications of integrals.
  
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    MATH 172 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

    (M1 900-2; MTH 902)
    Prerequisite: MATH 171  with a C or better
    5 lectures per week: 5 hrs transfer credit
    This is the second course in the three-semester sequence of courses covering calculus for scientists and engineers. Topics covered include applications of integrals, transcendental functions, integration techniques, L’Hopital’s rules, improper integrals, infinite sequences and series, and polar coordinates.
  
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    MATH 173 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III

    (M1 900-3; MTH 903)
    Prerequisite: MATH 172  with a C or better
    5 lectures per week: 5 hrs transfer credit
    This is the final course in the three-semester sequence of courses covering calculus for scientists and engineers. Topics covered include basic operations on vectors, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus.
  
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    MATH 200 Mathematics for Elementary Teaching I


    Prerequisite: MATH 095  and MATH 096 , both with at least a C; or MATH 095  and one year of high school geometry, both with at least a C; or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test.
    4 lectures per week: 4 hrs transfer credit
    This course covers topics using problem solving, bases other than ten, estimation, mental math, number systems, and operations in the number systems using algorithmic and non-algorithmic techniques. The two-course sequence of MATH 200 and MATH 206  is designed for Education majors seeking state licensure. This is a mathematics content course, not a methods course in teaching mathematics.
  
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    MATH 201 Engineering Computer Programming


    Prerequisite: MATH 171  with a C or better
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course is designed to use the computer in the study of problems in engineering, mathematics, or physical sciences. The emphasis is on problem analysis and problem solving.
  
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    MATH 206 Mathematics for Elementary Teaching II

    (M1 903)
    Prerequisite: MATH 200  with a C or better
    4 lectures per week: 4 hrs transfer credit
    This course is a continuation of Mathematics for Elementary Teaching I. The topics studied include geometry, probability, statistics, and measurement. Mathematical reasoning and problem solving are emphasized. This course is the second in the two course sequence of MATH 200  and MATH 206 designed for Education majors seeking state licensure. This course provides general education credit. This is a mathematics content course, not a methods course in teaching mathematics.
  
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    MATH 210 Discrete Mathematics

    (M1 905; CS 915)
    Prerequisite: MATH 151  with a C or better or qualifying score on the Math Placement Test
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This beginning course in the mathematics of computer science introduces mathematical analysis of finite collections and mathematical analysis of sequential machines, computer system design, data structures, and algorithms. Topics include sets, counting, recursion, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and formal grammars.
  
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    MATH 216 Differential Equations

    (MTH 912
    Prerequisite: MATH 172  with a C or better
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    Offered spring semester only. This is a first course in ordinary differential equations with applications to the physical sciences. Topics covered include recognition, classification and solution of differential equations, as well as the expression of applied problems as differential equations. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced study in mathematics, science, and engineering.
  
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    MATH 220 Linear Algebra


    Prerequisite: MATH 172  with a C or better
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course is intended as a transition between the calculus sequence and upper level courses in mathematics. Topics covered include vectors, vector spaces, matrices, determinants, matrix algebra, linear independence, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. A significant portion of the course is devoted to theory and proof construction.

Meteorology

  
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    METEO 150 Introduction to Meteorology

    (P1 905)
    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This is a non-lab physical science course surveying topics related to weather, climate, and the atmosphere. Studies include air masses and fronts, global circulation, severe weather, and climate. Students examine weather’s impact on humans, and humans’ impact on weather and climate.

Millwright

  
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    MILL 101 Industrial Maintenance Techniques I


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course teaches reading and use of micrometers, vernier calipers, dial indicators, and other measuring tools. Other topics include hand and power tools used by the millwright, fastener identification, layout and drilling operations, as well as reaming and taping drilled holes.
  
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    MILL 102 Industrial Maintenance Techniques II


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course covers the installation of machinery coupled with the principles of steel construction. Also covered are friction bearings, non-friction bearings, couplings, gearing, and reduction build-up.
  
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    MILL 103 Lubrication


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This unit of study introduces students to the theories of lubrication, lubrication oils, greases, and solid lubricants, as well as the principles of lubrication, lubricating machine parts, lubrication storage, and safety. Other topics include lubricant application and its history, as well as centralized lubricating systems, system components, conductors, and connectors.
  
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    MILL 105 Rigging


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course familiarizes students with the safe and accepted industry practices as applied to rigging, rigging equipment, and its proper maintenance.
  
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    MILL 106 Power Train Elements


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course introduces the installation and alignment of component parts found in industrial equipment and machinery. Topics include the mounting of bearings, gearings, couplings, pulley clutches, and belts. Conveyors and chaindrives are also covered. Equipment and coaxial alignment are stressed.
  
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    MILL 107 Machine Vibration Analysis I


    Prerequisite: None
    2 lectures per week: 2 hrs credit
    This course provides industrial maintenance technicians with an understanding of vibration analysis, rotating machine monitoring techniques, data collection, and analysis techniques.

Music

  
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    MUSIC 100 Fundamentals of Music Theory


    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course introduces the basic principles of interpreting and understanding the language of music. It includes the study of notation, rhythm, scales, intervals, basic forms, musical terms, and introduction to the keyboard.
  
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    MUSIC 101 Musicianship I


    Prerequisite: MUSIC 100  (or equivalent)
    4 lecture hrs per week: 4 hrs transfer credit
    This course is the first in a sequence of four that provides extensive training in Western music theory and aural skills. Common structures and organization of music is examined through written and aural analysis of chord progressions, melodies, metric and rhythmic patterns, tonal centers, dynamics, and instrumentation with an emphasis on development of sight-singing, dictation, and transcription skills. It is required for all degree programs in music.
  
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    MUSIC 102 Musicianship II


    Prerequisite: MUSIC 101  
    4 lecture hrs per week: 4 hrs transfer credit
    This course is the second in a sequence of four that provides extensive training in the fundamentals of music theory and ear training. It deals with the notational and aural aspects of Western music including scales, intervals, meter, rhythm, melody, and chords, using 4-part chorale writing for a basis for the study of chord progressions. It provides training in sight singing, melodic and rhythmic dictation, and chord recognition. It is required for all music majors and minors.
  
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    MUSIC 110 Concert Choir


    Prerequisite: None
    1 lecture, 2 lab hrs per week: 1 hr transfer credit
    This ensemble is open to music majors and all students interested in singing with a large concert choir. An audition may be required. The course may be repeated up to three times for credit.
  
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    MUSIC 115 Orchestral String Ensemble


    Prerequisite: None
    1 lecture, 2 lab hrs per week: 1 hr transfer credit
    This ensemble provides an opportunity for musicians who play traditional orchestral string instruments (violin, viola, cello, double bass) to study and perform significant string literature in an ensemble. Students must know how to read music and have at least an intermediate playing ability to participate. The course may be repeated up to three times for credit.
  
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    MUSIC 120 Wind Ensemble


    Prerequisite: None
    1 lecture, 2 lab hrs per week: 1 hr transfer credit
    This course is open to music majors and all students interested in the opportunity to study and perform significant concert band literature in an ensemble. Students may need to demonstrate an intermediate level or higher playing skill through audition. May be repeated up to three times for credit.
  
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    MUSIC 125 Latin Music Ensemble


    Prerequisite: None
    1 lecture, 2 lab hrs per week: 1 hr transfer credit
    This ensemble explores a variety of styles of Latin American music through the arranging and performance of masterpieces from both the commercial and conservatory repertoire. Students are introduced to the foundational rhythms and performance techniques of various percussion instruments. In addition to percussion, instrumentation can include horns, bass, guitar, and piano.
  
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    MUSIC 130 Music Appreciation

    (F1 900)
    Prerequisite: Placement into ENG 099  or higher
    3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit
    This course uses representative masterpieces to help students develop an appreciation for different kinds of music. Emphasis is placed on improving listening skills in order to identify and analyze elements and structures in music. Historical and societal influences, styles, and functions of music are considered through the study of great composers and performers.
 

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